Project

General

Profile

Code of conduct

This page contains our code of conduct as well as our 3 social rules. Please read them if you're interested in participating in Lass-related projects.

Code of conduct

  • Strive to provide a friendly, safe and welcoming environment for all, regardless of level of experience, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, personal appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, age, religion, nationality, or other similar characteristic.
  • Do not subject anyone to misogynist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist or otherwise discriminatory jokes, language, or behaviour.
  • Avoid using overtly sexual nicknames or other nicknames that might detract from a friendly, safe and welcoming environment for all.
  • Be kind and courteous. There's no need to be mean or rude.
  • If you are told that your behaviour is making someone uncomfortable, cease that behaviour.
  • We will exclude you from interaction if you engage in any of the following behaviour, in public or in private:
    • Violence, threats of violence or violent language directed against another person.
    • Posting or displaying sexually explicit or violent material.
    • Posting or threatening to post other people’s personally identifying information ("doxing").
    • Inappropriate photography or recording.
    • Inappropriate physical contact. You should have someone’s consent before touching them.
    • Unwelcome sexual attention. This includes sexualized comments or jokes, inappropriate touching, groping, and unwelcomed sexual advances.
    • Deliberate intimidation, stalking or following (online or in person).
    • Advocating for, or encouraging, any of the above behavior.
    • Sustained disruption of community events, including talks and presentations.
  • Respect that people have differences of opinion and that every design or implementation choice carries a trade-off and numerous costs. There is seldom a right answer.
  • Keep unstructured critique to a minimum. If you have solid ideas you want to experiment with, make a fork and see how it works.

Social rules

Whereas the rules of the code of conduct are designed to prevent hurtful behaviours, the social rules are designed to prevent annoying and derailing behaviours. They are:

  1. NO FEIGNING SURPRISE
    • Explanation: don't pretend to be surprised when others don't know something (e.g., "You don't know what JavaScript is?"). This behaviour makes people uncomfortable with asking questions or admitting ignorance, which is highly undesirable for a collaborative environment.
  2. NO "WELL ACTUALLY'S"
    • Explanation: we strive to be as precise as possible in our documentation. However, there is no need to correct others on minor, irrelevant details during casual conversation.
  3. NO BACKSEAT DRIVING
    • Explanation: don't butt into conversations with unsolicited advice or suggestions.

Dealing with violations

If you see someone breaking the code of conduct in a relatively minor way, and you feel comfortable doing so, tell them privately. If you're not comfortable with that or it's a more serious offense, go to a Manager or Administrator. Unless the offense occurred in a private interaction between you and the offender, we will not mention your name to them without your permission.

If you see someone breaking the social rules, tell them directly. You can tell them in private, but it's also acceptable to tell them in public. The behaviours that the social rules ban are actually very common and quite easy to spot, so calling them out should be as simple as "hey, you just feigned surprise" or "hey, that's a well-actually". That said, if you don't feel comfortable going to that person, or the person acts defensive, speak to a Manager or Administrator.

Dealing with being called out

If a regular user (that is, not a Manager or Administrator) calls out your behaviour, the most important thing is to not get defensive with them. Instead, if you feel that they are being unfair or misguided, take it up with a Manager or Administrator.

Commentary

This section contains commentary on various aspects of the code of conduct and the social rules. It is not required reading, but it may be useful in answering questions you might have.

As stated in the "Acknowledgements" section, our code of conduct is generally derived from Rust's, with pieces from the Citizen code of conduct and the Django code of conduct. However, there are some notable changes:

  • The Rust code differentiates "gender" from "gender identity and expression". With the exception of agender and other related gender identities, we don't believe it makes sense to present gender as different from gender identity. However, we also don't think the word "gender" by itself explicitly protects trans people, or people who don't have genders. This is why we went with "gender identity" and "gender expression".
  • We replaced instances of the word "sexism" with "misogyny" to be clearer and more consistent with the rest of the list of banned discriminatory behaviours. Just as homophobia is not general prejudice based on sexuality but rather primarily aimed at gay people, misogyny is not general prejudice based on gender but rather primarily aimed at women.
  • We moved the rule against discriminatory language and behaviour out of the section that begins with "We will exclude you from interaction..." to its own spot higher on the list. While we won't tolerate discriminatory language and behaviour, we won't necessarily kick you out for it—for example, ableist slurs tend to be a very common element in casual language.
  • We also removed "personal insults" from that section because when someone is bullied, harassed, or otherwise put down, we think it's understandable if they respond with insults. We don't want to punish both the bully and the bullied, and we think our "be kind and courteous" rule already addresses the former.

If you're wondering why there are only 3 social rules instead of the original 4, read this post.

Acknowledgements

The text of the code of conduct is derived from "The Rust Code of Conduct", "Citizen Code of Conduct", and "Django Code of Conduct". The social rules are derived from "The Recurse Center User's Manual".

The license for the Rust Code of Conduct is below:

Copyright (c) 2014 The Rust Project Developers

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any
person obtaining a copy of this software and associated
documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the
Software without restriction, including without
limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge,
publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of
the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software
is furnished to do so, subject to the following
conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice
shall be included in all copies or substantial portions
of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF
ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED
TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT
SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY
CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION
OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR
IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER
DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

The license for the Citizen Code of Conduct is a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. The license for the Django Code of Conduct is a Creative Commons Attribution license.